Sunday, August 8, 2010

TSS/Sunday Book Coveting: Poetry Books

It has been a while I did a Sunday book coveting post. Here are a few poetry books I covet. If you know any contemporary poet and like to recommend his/her book, I welcome it. Anyone offering me to review their poetry books, are also welcome.

1) Incivilities by Barbara Claire Freeman

From author's website:

In her first collection, Barbara Claire Freeman links lyric subjectivity to an exploration of crucial moments in U.S. history. There are meditations on the Declaration of Independence, institution of slavery, Gold Rush, Lewis and Clark Expedition, Civil War, Great Depression, terrorist attacks of 9/11, as well as on our contemporary economic and cultural lives. These formally inventive poems braid the personal and the political. They offer no compromise, no synthesis, but they do offer hope as they invite critical reflection of "authorized history" and trace the efforts of historical subjects to make and remake their lives. Incivilities is committed to the past and to the present, envisioning a poetry that might function both as a ritualistic act of imagining and as a talisman against forgetting.

2) Toxic Flora by Kimiko Hahn

Publishers Weekly

These sharp, gut-punching lyrics quote from and/or borrow the diction of science writing in order to investigate more personal issues, including the traumas of girlhood, adolescence, and family in general, as well as the intricacies of love…. In what may be Hahn's best book to date.


3) Seedlip and Sweet Apple: Poems by by Arra Lynn Ross

Product Description

Broadly and inclusively spiritual, this remarkable debut captures the ineffable experience of ecstatic vision, activating the progression from literal reality to heightened perception. Simultaneously, this journey delves into the manifold issues of gender and religion, public image, and charismatic leadership, as well as the line between cult and commune and the tenuous bond between faith and behavior. Written in an impressive cornucopia of forms — including iambic quatrains, free verse, and prose poems — Seedlip and Sweet Apple honors a complex figure startlingly relevant to contemporary life, pointing to a revolutionary way to work at living — and to live in working — that promises simplicity, peace, and joy.

3 comments:

readerbuzz said...

I love poetry. Better than anything else. Good poetry, that is. Bad poetry is worse than anything else.

I wonder why that is....

Melissa (Betty and Boo's Mommy) said...

I just finished Edward Hirsch's "The Living Fire: New and Selected Poems" which I really enjoyed. He's become one of my new favorites.

Erotic Horizon said...

I hope you get your hands on those soon...

I have been reading alot of poetry recently -it centers me somehow...

I found Stone Hotel - Reagan Butcher recently and it's BRILLIANT...

it on a free down load HERE

http://www.crimethinc.com/books/sh/Stone_Hotel_hi.pdf

have a good week...

E.H>