Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Wondrous Words Wednesday (Poetry words)

wordyweds

Wondrous Word Wednesday is hosted by Kathy of BermudaOnion

Most know that I am a poet. For that I keep exploring new forms of poetry. Today I take fairly easier forms of poetry words from various online sources.

1) Jabberwocky: Famous nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll which first appeared in Alice Through the Looking Glass.

2) Madrigal: A short love poem which can easily be set to music.

3) Mimesis: The imitation of reality in art/poetry

4) Quatorzain: Fourteen line irregular sonnet.

5) Senryu: A form developed by the Japanese poet Senryu Karai (1718-1790), which is almost identical to a haiku but takes as its subject matter human issues rather than nature.

9 comments:

Julie P. said...

What a wonderful idea! I have "heard" of a few of those words, but I'm not sure I understood their meanings. I also learned some new ones!

Jo-Jo said...

These are all new to me! Thanks for sharing these this week.

Margot at Joyfully Retired said...

I'd like to see a Senryu. I love haiku so I'd like to see the difference. Thanks for the new words.

carolsnotebook said...

The first two I new, but after that they were all new. Great idea for words.

bermudaonion said...

When I saw you were using poetry words, I knew they'd be new to me. Hopefully I learned something new from you today! Thanks for participating.

The Westie Loving Therapist said...

I had at least heard the first three words in all my years of English, but not the last two. Thanks for the poetry lesson!

Lisa notes... said...

I've always thought Jabberwocky was a really wacky poem. ha. So it is a very good title for the poem. Nice list.

Shannansbooks said...

I have never heard of the last two but the firs 3 I know. I love the jabberwocky. I read the Alice books earlier this year.

ds said...

O frabjous day! Thank you especially for the definition of senryu. I know someone who is writing her autobiography in haiku; she will be thrilled to know that there is a way to keep some of "herself" in, too. Callou, callay!